finding conversations about the Bible and about God

Did you find this blog post as one of the WordPress tags? Or because you follow this blog on wordpress.com? Or something else?

If you’d be so kind to add a comment and let me know how you got here, that would help me figure out how to better tag and present mu blog posts on the Bible or whatever topic.

There are so many ways to find content these days beyond the search engine. Different apps and websites call it Explore or Discover. I can’t count them all. I know lots of people are spending lots of time on Facebook, but that doesn’t necessarily means there are not people here browsing for content on wordpress.com.

Following WordPress Tags

Today I was intrigued by the WordPress.com tags and how you can click on popular tags or follow specific ones in your WordPress reader. This link to Bible shows you the most recent posts tagged with the Bible tag. Or, in the Bible category. Yes, tags and categories are almost interchangeable in the wordpress system.

Bible tag

Blogging my conversations with God

Started a blog at demystifying.bible a couple months ago. Yes, that is a real domain name, a real web address, pretty neat, eh?

I’m discovering that by using my own words in talking with God, that, this has helped me to be more engaged in prayer. And that’s a good thing. I’m finding that it’s boosted my spiritual life to converge prayer and writing and talking. Along the way, this has furthered a discovery of my prayer language.

If prayer can be thought of as having a conversation with God, then it should be okay to talk with God in my own words the way I talk and think and feel. After all, a number of people are doing that with the Bible, paraphrasing it and publishing new Bible versions to make the Bible more understandable. Surely, making prayer more understandable to the person that is praying can only be helpful.

Read more about the origins of this experimental project that is running for 30 weeks, join it already in progress. And follow along there at demystifying.bible.

How to removed linked blogs from wordpress.com

WordPress.com is a most wonderful gift to humanity, powering thousands and maybe millions of blogs and websites for everyday people along with some VIPs too.

One thing that’s a bonus feature in the WordPress admin is to link self-hosted (powered by WordPress.org) blogs to the global dashboard at wordpress.com for all blogs, both the ones at wordpress.com and self-hosted ones, under a section currently known as Linked Blogs. And having one dashboard for all your blogs is nice to view stats and to do other admin things in one place.

A little background for those that like context: how blogs get added to the “Linked Blogs” section of the global dashboard is using the JetPack plugin from the self-hosted blog/site’s admin, and your blog/site gets linked when you click on the “Connect with Jetpack” button.

But, sometimes a domain expires with a self-hosted WordPress blog and you can’t access it no more, or you just want to remove the linked blogs from the global dashboard while you’re here.

Some others have come across this dilemma too, as these search results indicate:

After some intensive searching, found the answer at Disconnect Jetpack Sites, where it says:

You can find step-by-step guides below that will help you remove a self-hosted WordPress site you had previously connected to your WordPress.com account thanks to the Jetpack plugin.

And here’s the answer! Remove an old site that is no longer online from your WordPress.com account. In other words, these are the instructions for how to remove linked blogs from your wordpress.com dashboard.

In case you don’t see the “disconnect site” link on the left-hand side, try selecting that site  (by clicking on blog/site title) & go down under section “Configure” & click on “Settings”. You might see this notification:

screen-shot-2016-12-09-at-9-21-17-am

That’s ok. Then scroll to the bottom of that page and look for this:

screen-shot-2016-12-09-at-9-10-00-am

There it is, click on “DISCONNECT SITE”, confirm, and you’re good.

Aside: There are clear instructions for how to delete a wordpress.com site or blog. But be fully-aware that deleting a site permanently removes it and you’ll never be able to re-use its WordPress.com address (such as yourgroovysite.wordpress.com).

 

what’s not allowed on a WordPress.com blog

It’s not the easiest thing to find with mobile devices driving web design and oversimplified user interfaces, but having a blog powered by wordpress.com does come with some basic guidelines and rules for what content is allowed or prohibited at a wordpress.com blog, known as its Terms of Service (https://en.wordpress.com/tos/). And, occasionally the terms are updated and noted in the change log, most recently on October 9, 2016. The content that’s prohibited isn’t unreasonable but they should be made known and easier to find. Thus this blog post.

Here’s a mention of what content is prohibited and not allowed on wordpress.com blogs:

“make sure that none of the prohibited items (like spam, viruses, or serious threats of violence) appear on your website”

… you are entirely responsible for the content of, and any harm resulting from, that Content or your conduct. That is the case regardless of what form the Content takes, which includes, but is not limited to text, photo, video, audio, or code. By using WordPress.com, you represent and warrant that your Content and conduct do not violate these terms or the User Guidelines.

Here’s more details about prohibited content from the WordPress.com User Guidelines—

User Guidelines

To be transparent about what is and isn’t allowed on your site, we’ve put together this set of guidelines. The following activity/material isn’t allowed on WordPress.com.

  • Illegal content and conduct.
  • Intellectual property infringement.
  • Pornography.
  • Technologically harmful content.
  • Impersonation.
  • Directly threatening material.
  • Posting private information.
  • Advertising.
  • Hotlinking to WordPress.com.
  • Spam or machine-generated content.
  • Bear in mind that these are just guidelines — interpretations are up to us. These guidelines are not exhaustive and are subject to change.

And, WordPress.com is not to be used for archiving of tweets, as noted in a previous post titled WordPress.com is not for archiving. In case your blog gets an “account suspended” notice for an unknown reason, contact the good people at WordPress to inquire, via en.support.wordpress.com/suspended-blogs.

unable to migrate posts from here to my main blog djchuang.com

I used the export command here at this wordpress.com and wanted to import my posts over to my main blog at http://djchuang.com but most of those posts didn’t import properly. Here’s what I was thinking: I’m starting to pick up significant traffic here with my random blog posts and I thought it’d be better for people to connect with all of my content in one place at my main blog, rather than having 2 or 3 or more blogs scattered all over the internet.

While my main blog also runs on WordPress, the self-installed wordpress.org kind, apparently there is more to it than just export/import to migrate content. I don’t want to expend the time to figure out what else needs to be configured or tweaked to get all the posts here migrated over.. what I might do is the old-fashioned copy/paste of the popular posts to migrate the content over, and that’ll be a lot easier than trying to work at the code or XML level trying to debug and troubleshoot why importing didn’t work right.

If you have a quick tip on how to get the export/import to work better, please add a comment here and let me know, ok? thanks a bunch

Which wordpress.com account is JetPack connected to?

When you have a self-installed WordPress.org website/blog, it can get Site Stats using the JetPack plugin when connected via WordPress.com . But, how do you know which wordpress.com account your website/blog is connected to via JetPack? Here’s the response I got from tech support:

While you cannot find any information about the WordPress.com account linked to your Jetpack site in your dashboard, this site will appear in your list of blogs on WordPress.com.

If you do not remember which account you used to make the original connection, the best solution is to go to the Jetpack menu in your dashboard, and disconnect from WordPress.com.

You can then reconnect with your current WordPress.com account… Once you have reconnected, your Stats, subscribers, and other Jetpack options will be reconnected to your site and associated to the right WordPress.com account.

Custom Page Templates Not Showing Up in WordPress | EliteFreelancing.com

The problem

I uploaded a custom page template to my FTP and and wasn???t not showing up in the WordPress admin.  So I double and triple checked to make sure my Template tags were all cool, and they were. Normally, a drop down that lets me choose which page template I want to use will show up, but for some reason: no dice.

The fix

What seemed to fix the problem was the following:

  • Activate a different theme (I just activated the default)
  • Reactivate your desired theme
  • Go to Manage > Pages
  • And you should now see the Page Template

This fixed it for me too.