Info about the Table Project Church App

The Table Project was a free church-based social network that had a good run from 2011-2016. Their own marketing had this description:

“The Table is a relational, online web application, custom-tailored for the church. Their purpose is to help churches engage their community, empower leaders and move people beyond the pews and into authentic, life-changing friendships.”

In May 2013, Gateway Church in Southlake, Texas, acquired The Table (ht: Church Tech Today; Churchmag; CMS; Press Release). At that time, The Table had empowered more than 700 churches “to take community to the next level.” The church had ambitious plans for this church social network, as described here:

“… the leaders at Gateway began researching ways to merge spiritual learning, active pastoring and community with technology—around the same time The Table began working toward church community building. Now, the two are joining forces, each bringing unique strengths, to see the dream for church congregations to make connections and learn more about the Bible through The Table.”

When The Table was hitting its stride and gaining traction, it was serving over 7,000 churches in 62 countries, mobilized over 24,000 volunteers, and tracked over 2.3 million prayers prayed. Influential churches using The Table included Gateway Church (Southlake, Texas), Granger Community Church, Bethlehem Baptist Church, and Substance Church.

table-statistics

By September 2016, this tweet linked to an “Important Table Update” that most likely announced the shutdown of The Table. (Currently, unable to find an archive or cache of that announcement on the internet.)

2016-sep-update-table

In March 2017, Carlos asked a Table team member that replied: “the organization we sold it to shut it down”.

2017-mar-table-shutdown

When Josh asked in July 2017 about what happened to the Table Project, the reply was: “it was sold to Gateway Church a few years back and they have begun to shut down service at this point.”

2017-jul-table-shutdown

That’s all the information that is available on the internet we can find. If you know of other public chatter, please add a comment so we learn more.

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How to Print Website Like It Looks on Screen

Printing a web page so it looks like how it appears on a screen doesn’t always work. Well, the printed website looks messed up, garbled and ugly. It shouldn’t be so hard to just print a web page WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get.)

And it doesn’t matter if you’re printing on paper or saving a web page as a PDF file. 2 websites that I had difficulty saving neatly as a PDF were americanmomentum.bank and goldenvalley.blog/welcome-to-our-new-website.

print-not-right.png

I’ll explain why later, but here are the solutions I found to save PDF of web pages so it looks right (note: not every item listed here will work for every web page)—

Browser Extensions

Software Clients

Why a Printed Web Page Doesn’t Look Right

Why is this: because web developers now not only have to design their website for different sizes of devices and browsers, but they also may need a separate design for printing, depending on how the stylesheet is designed. Some websites realize that its users would want to print their web pages and  provide a printer-friendly version. But that’s in the minority. The rest of the internet have web pages that may or may not print like it looks on the screen.

This is an on-going discussion that dates back for years. This 2013 discussion thread, WYSIWYG Web Page printing in Mac OS X 10.8, had a comment saying that it’s an industry problem:

This appears to be an industry-wide issue. I only searched for a short time, but there appears to be no solution – with very little acknowledgement that there is  a problem. “Solutions,” as you have seen, tend to be from the coders perspective, talking about the problem from a CSS or HTML  – not plugins for the client side.

At superuser.com, the same question is discussed @ “How to get WYSIWYP (print what you see) in a web browser?” and “Why do my webpages not print what I see in my browser?

That’s why you and I have to go searching for a solution to fix this so we can print a web page or save a PDF version that looks like it does on screen, or at the very least, to be legible and readable.

Subject Lines from Staples Email Newsletters

Do you like how emails try to get your attention in the subject line? Would these subject lines make you click and open their email newsletter? Here’s some recent examples from Staples.com:

Screen Shot 2017-01-06 at 9.18.53 AM.png

  • 😉 THANKS: You received a Staples ink promo! – Don’t miss out on all these ways to save!
  • 🙂 Hi there! Here are your COUPONS. – Want more savings? Click here!
  • 🙂 OPEN ASAP: You’ve acquired an up to 50% discount. – Start saving even more!
  • Are you tech savvy? Up to $50 off these gifts! – Start saving even more!
  • ATTN: YOUR ink & toner discounts have arrived! – Don’t miss out on all these ways to save!
  • Confirmed: Promos are inside. – More unreal deals are waiting inside!
  • Don’t miss out. $30 coupons inside. – Shop Staples — save every time. DAILY DEALS STAPLES
  • Earned it ✔ You made the list for a COUPON for 15% off! – Want more savings? Click here!
  • Here is a 20% COUPON to get your fix. Well done! – Want more savings? Click here!
  • It’s yours – $15 ink & toner rewards. – More. More. More ways to save!
  • Not kidding! Up to $200 off laptops, happening now. – Want more savings? Click here!
  • ONLY HERE! These deals won’t last! – Start saving even more!
  • Ready for you: We’ve enclosed your 31% off Daily Deal. – Want more savings? Click here!
  • Special thanks! Up to $200 off this tech must have! – More. More. More ways to save!
  • THANKS! You’ve received paper for $29.99! – Ready for more savings? Click here!
  • Under $30 –– great gift ideas! – Don’t miss out on all these ways to save!
  • Up to $250 off — time to upgrade + Last Chance for Cyber Deals! – More unreal deals are waiting inside!
  • Up to 50% off –– save on chairs today! – Don’t miss out on all these ways to save!
  • You deserve the best –– up to $100 off! – More. More. More ways to save!
  • You’ve acquired a $200 discount. It’s confirmed! – Start saving even more!
  • You’ve made our list for 15% off ink & toner! – Ready for more savings? Click here!

What’s interesting is where Staples.com places its email subscription form for their daily deals and exclusive offers. It doesn’t look like it’s easy to find on every web page for some reason.screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-9-28-06-am

Starbucks’ Success Secret is Branding

2008 article about Taylor Clark’s book about Starbucks from the internet archives~

Not Just Coffee: Starbucks’ Rise to Success

By Maria O’Connell

An average of six new Starbucks cafés open in the world each day. In fifteen years, Starbucks has not only seeped into 37 countries and all 50 states, but has grown from100 stores to 13,000. The chain serves about 40 million customers each week, giving jobs to 25 million coffee farmers. Starbucks infiltrated the American landscape more quickly than any other company in history; it was rated by Interbrand as the fourth-most effective brand in the world, after Apple, Google, and Ikea.

Fascinated by Starbucks’ rise to fame, Taylor Clark, a freelance journalist from Portland, Oregon, recently released his first book–Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture. In it, he creates a detailed picture of Starbucks’ road to success, explaining how the organization integrated its way into society so effectively and so quickly.

Taylor claims that the secret behind Starbucks’ appeal is the incredible amount of control it exercises over its image. All decisions start and end with the company’s ringleader, Howard Schultz. Everything at Starbucks is planned. It is not just a Starbucks’ coffee that you get when you walk through the café doors; it is a Starbucks’ experience.

It was after careful psychological research that the company first decided to have white cups with green writing, “tall” lattes, natural materials, and round tables. Starbucks interviewed hundreds of coffee drinkers, seeking what it was that they wanted from a coffee shop. The overwhelming consensus actually had nothing to do with coffee; what consumers sought was a place of relaxation, a place of belonging. They sought an atmosphere.

The round tables in a Starbucks store were strategically created in an effort to protect self-esteem for those coffee-drinkers flying solo. After all, there are no “empty” seats at a round table. Service counters are built out of natural materials like warm woods and stone, rather than plastics and metals, to create a homier atmosphere.

Instead of ordering a “short” coffee or tea, one orders a “tall” at Starbucks.  The company intentionally formed their own coffee lingo, which by now could be recorded in a dictionary of coffee terminology. The terms “tall,” “grande,” and “venti” are the size options that Starbucks offers. The company was correct to assume that once their customers learned the lingo, other coffeehouses, where you must choose from a small, medium, or large, would make them feel uncomfortable and out of place. Starbucks’ coffee lingo gives the customer a chance to escape from American monotony and experience a charge of European sophistication.

Not surprisingly, the white and green Starbucks’ coffee cups were deliberately designed as well. These cups were created to be a walking advertisement for the company. Evidenced by more than 2 trillion customers each year, it worked.

Starbucks also has other branding secrets. The company will never discount drinks. Schultz is all about the image. He makes the point that you would never see a “buy one, get one free” deal on a Jaguar. In an effort to create brand prestige, he refuses to allow discounts. In addition, print ads for Starbucks often thank customers for their support of specific humanitarian concerns, such as tsunami relief. Starbucks donates money to many social causes. Thus, people are not only buying coffee or enjoying a relaxing atmosphere, they are also positively contributing to society.

The creation of Starbucks is a true story of success. Its marketing techniques have and will become an example to retail stores around the world. Undoubtedly, the Starbucks brand has been imprinted into history – making it one of those companies that will never disappear.

Starbucks Fact: “Contrary to popular belief, Starbucks actually boosts sales to nearby mom-and-pop coffee shops.”

For more information, please refer to Taylor Clark’s Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture.

starbucked_cover-193x300


This entry was posted on Wednesday, January 30th, 2008 at 3:26 pm 
with 1 comment

top 7 services for streaming movies – free or subscription

Yes we know the largest libraries of online streaming videos are Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime Instant Video. Plus, you could count Crackle too. (For this post , we’re not counting the pay-per-view streaming movies that could be purchased at online stores at iTunes, Google Play, Vudu, YouTube, and others.)

6-streaming-subscribe

But there’s more.

Here’s some other online libraries with 1000’s of movies and shows that can be streamed online, either free or for a basic subscription of under $10/month. (cf. Beyond Netflix and Hulu: 4 worthwhile movie streaming services.)

SnagFilms – over 10,000 films, with large selection of documentaries, foreign and independent films for free [aside: SnagFilms changed its logo in June 2013]

Fandor – “In terms of the breadth and depth of the cinematic experience, it would be hard to beat Fandor. For $10 a month, you get access to hundreds of motion pictures, from rare, serious European features to educational shorts and the silliest exploitation flicks.”

Mubi – “Every day our experts introduce you to a film they love and you have a whole month to watch it, so there will always be 30 extraordinary films for you to enjoy.” // if you like their taste in films, they’ll pick ’em for you so you don’t have waste time browsing through 100s and 1000s of average movies to find a great one to watch

[update 12/14/16] Found 2 more: Popcornflix • Tubi TV

71o1ehhxo3l  15

cf. MPAA’s list of all legal services


[photo credit: canistream.it]

what’s not allowed on a WordPress.com blog

It’s not the easiest thing to find with mobile devices driving web design and oversimplified user interfaces, but having a blog powered by wordpress.com does come with some basic guidelines and rules for what content is allowed or prohibited at a wordpress.com blog, known as its Terms of Service (https://en.wordpress.com/tos/). And, occasionally the terms are updated and noted in the change log, most recently on October 9, 2016. The content that’s prohibited isn’t unreasonable but they should be made known and easier to find. Thus this blog post.

Here’s a mention of what content is prohibited and not allowed on wordpress.com blogs:

“make sure that none of the prohibited items (like spam, viruses, or serious threats of violence) appear on your website”

… you are entirely responsible for the content of, and any harm resulting from, that Content or your conduct. That is the case regardless of what form the Content takes, which includes, but is not limited to text, photo, video, audio, or code. By using WordPress.com, you represent and warrant that your Content and conduct do not violate these terms or the User Guidelines.

Here’s more details about prohibited content from the WordPress.com User Guidelines—

User Guidelines

To be transparent about what is and isn’t allowed on your site, we’ve put together this set of guidelines. The following activity/material isn’t allowed on WordPress.com.

  • Illegal content and conduct.
  • Intellectual property infringement.
  • Pornography.
  • Technologically harmful content.
  • Impersonation.
  • Directly threatening material.
  • Posting private information.
  • Advertising.
  • Hotlinking to WordPress.com.
  • Spam or machine-generated content.
  • Bear in mind that these are just guidelines — interpretations are up to us. These guidelines are not exhaustive and are subject to change.

And, WordPress.com is not to be used for archiving of tweets, as noted in a previous post titled WordPress.com is not for archiving. In case your blog gets an “account suspended” notice for an unknown reason, contact the good people at WordPress to inquire, via en.support.wordpress.com/suspended-blogs.