orange asian man

scattering ideas for the good of humanity

essential difference between hypomania and mania — October 28, 2018

essential difference between hypomania and mania

While mania and hypomania have many similar symptoms, like having high energy, rapid thinking. and such. What makes it mania, instead of hypomania. are these differentiating characters:

  1. lasts at least a week
  2. severely impaired from normal functioning, feeling debilitated
Medicinenet states it this way, from https://www.medicinenet.com/mania_vs_hypomania/article.htm#mania_vs_hypomania_facts

What is mania and what is hypomania?

  • Mania is a severe episode of elevated/euphoric or irritable mood and increased energy that usually lasts at least a week and severely interferes with the sufferer’s ability to function.
  • Hypomania is a less severe version of mania, in that it is characterized by somewhat elevated or irritable mood that may more mildly interfere with a person’s functioning to a less debilitating degree than mania.
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What Stan said about the decades of a leader’s development — October 27, 2018

What Stan said about the decades of a leader’s development

Sagely insight from leadership coach Stan Endicott, who I heard at the first Thirty.Network signature gathering a few years ago—

  • In your 20’s you discover who you are,
  • in your 30’s you do it,
  • in your 40’s you get really good at it,
  • in your 50’s you train up and teach others how to do what you’ve done, and
  • in your 60’s you’re the wise old sage and you it’s then time to reinvent yourself.

The original quote as captured by Brian who’s been coached by Stan:

Stan Endicott, always reminds me about the mark of the decades…which makes growing older sound like A LOT of fun! Stan says, ‘In your 20’s you discover who you are, in your 30’s you do it, in your 40’s you get really good at it, in your 50’s you train up and teach others how to do what you’ve done and in your 60’s you’re the wise old sage and you it’s then time to reinvent yourself.

Source: BRIAN WURZELL :: BLOG

Can I add Google Analytics to a WordPress.com site? — September 17, 2018

Can I add Google Analytics to a WordPress.com site?

To get Google Analytics site statistics on your website powered by WordPress.com, you will need to upgrade to the Business plan.

Here’s how it’s stated at this WordPress.com support article about Google Analytics:

Google Analytics support on WordPress.com is available as a feature of the WordPress.com Business plan. Visit Settings → Traffic under My Sites to enable Google Analytics.

If you paid for the right upgrade, you’ll be able to see a screen that looks something like this:

Is the answer yes or no for using Google Analytics on WordPress.com?

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How to turn off Google Smarts in Chrome browser? — September 14, 2018

How to turn off Google Smarts in Chrome browser?

The latest Google Chrome browser released in September 2018 has a nifty feature called Google Smarts. It makes the omnibox even smarter, the announcement describes it as:

Smart answers directly in your search bar

You know the box at the top of Chrome that combines the search bar and address bar into one? We call it the Omnibox, and we built it so that you can get to your search results as fast as possible. Today, we’re making it even more convenient to use. It will now show you answers directly in the address bar without having to open a new tab—from rich results on public figures or sporting events, to instant answers like the local weather via weather.com or a translation of a foreign word.

Screen Shot 2018-09-14 at 12.06.43 PM

Disable that Google Smarts feature

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Using an inactive Twitter username — August 29, 2018

Using an inactive Twitter username

Twitter has an inactive account policy. A Twitter account is considered active when that account has a “log in and Tweet at least every 6 months.” That policy also states that “Accounts may be permanently removed due to prolonged inactivity.”

If any Twitter account, whether active or inactive, is using your registered trademark as its username, you may be able to obtain rights to that username. Check the Trademark Policy for what counts as a violation. Then you can report a trademark issue.

What if you don’t have a trademark? You can request access to an inactive Twitter username if you have some kind of a right to use it, because it is your name, your brand name, or something else you can show Twitter to make a case for why you should be granted that username.

Requesting an inactive Twitter username

Follow these instructions by Richard Lazazzera for How to Claim an Inactive Twitter Username. Even though there isn’t a specific form for claiming an inactive username, the process for reporting a Twitter username for impersonation will suffice.

You do have several options when reporting an account for impersonation, to indicate that an account is pretending “to be me or someone I know” or “to be or represent my company, brand, or organization.”

Upload documentation to prove you’re authorized

What does this look like? Here’s the example wording of an email you would receive after submitting the impersonation form:

We have received your report on the impersonation of someone you represent on Twitter.

Our next steps:
First, we need to confirm that you are authorized to represent this individual. Below you’ll find instructions and a link you can use to upload copies of documentary proof. Then we’ll review and process your report. We can’t review your report until the documentation is received.

Your next steps:
In order to confirm that you are authorized to represent this individual, please review the instructions below and upload the requested documentation. Please make sure to upload a legible copy so we can review the full name and photo on the ID. This information will be kept confidential and your documentation will be deleted.

Instructions:
Choose one of the following options, then click on the link below to upload the requested document(s):

Option 1:

* A copy of the impersonated individual’s valid government-issued photo ID (e.g., driver’s license, passport).

* If you are claiming impersonation against an account that is not using the individual’s legal name, you will need to include documentary evidence that the legal name is connected to the name you are reporting (i.e., proof of registration of the trade name or pseudonym).

Option 2:

* Documentation stating that you have authority to act on the impersonated individual’s behalf (e.g., agent’s agreement, power of attorney, etc.).

* A copy of your valid government-issued photo ID (e.g., driver’s license, passport).

* A copy of your business card.

Twitter may release the inactive username after authorization

When the Twitter Trust & Safety team has determined that you’re authorized to make the request, you might receive an email that looks like this:

The account you have reported does not violate our impersonation policy, but it is currently inactive.  We can release this username for your brand’s use by transferring the username to a Twitter account that you manage. We can either rename an account you currently have or transfer the username to a new placeholder account that you create.

To proceed with the transfer, simply reply to this email with the username of the account you want renamed with the requested username. This could be an existing Twitter account that you want renamed or a new placeholder account (for example, twitter.com/temp123 or @temp123). Once we receive the username for the existing account you want renamed or placeholder account, we will apply the requested username to it.

A username transfer only changes the username of your account. All the existing content on your existing or placeholder account (followers, Tweets) will remain intact. Similarly, a username change will not affect your existing followers, direct messages, or @replies. Your followers will simply see a new username next to your picture when you Tweet. Since other users will need to @mention and message you at your new username, you may find it helpful to post a Tweet to let your followers know that you’ve selected a new username.

After the transfer, your previous or temporary placeholder username will be released immediately for use by other accounts.

When Twitter releases an inactive username for you

A Twitter username gets released when Twitter transfers the inactive username to your account, whether its a placeholder one or an active one. Here’s an example of the success email:

Thanks for bringing this to our attention. We’ve now associated the username with the account you specified.

If you’re using email addresses from your official company domain, please be sure the accounts are registered with emails at that domain. This makes it much easier to assist you if you lose access to any of your accounts in the future.

Hope this information is helpful to you. May the odds be ever in your favor.